Deciding future generations of SLTs

interviews

As an A-level student I recall visiting a number of universities for interviews. This was all part of the application process to getting onto a speech and language therapy course. I must admit I was a young 17 year old with not a lot of life experience. The interviews varied- most included an element of talking about why I wanted to be a speech therapist but some included a kinds of comprehension or listening test. Others included group tasks. All were rather scary and at the same time quite awesome.  To my amazement I was offered a place at UCL, city, reading and Leicester – argh how to decide. I was going to have to pay for my degree and was planning to choose the university closest to where I lived. I was the first cohort of students who would have to pay- across the board (all subjects). But just as we were undergoing these interviews we found out that the NHS were planning to pay our fees. This was great news!

 

Many years later I have started helping out with the entrance interviews at UCL. It is equally awesome to sit on the other side. The interviews I helped out on last year include the old “what will make you a good speech and language therapist?” question but also included service users as interviewees. People with communication difficulties- adults who have had brain injuries or strokes attended part of the interview. Potential students were asked questions by these people with communication difficulties. These service users were directly involved in deciding who would make a good future speech and language therapist. What a change. It’s a brilliant example of how service users can be involved in building the workforce who support them. It’s an inspiring example of how people with communication difficulties can be involved.

 

This initiative was driven by an NHS that would like to ensure they are training the right people to become the right speech and language therapists. It was formulated and implemented by a wonderfully creative group of speech therapists  and teaching fellows whom I admire greatly for their innovative and creative thinking. Often it is assumed that people with communication difficulties are unable to engage in service user involvement activities. This just shows that people with communication difficulties are brilliantly able to do this- with the right supports and strategies in place.

 

Sadly this is one of the last years that speech and language therapy training courses (and many other health professions training courses) will be financially supported by the NHS. End of an era. I do hope however that doesn’t change the way we try to hone and develop the profession to continue finding and training skilled and empathic therapists.

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