My wonderful consensus group! (and by that I mean the wonderful participants)

I am writing an extra special post this week to thank all the amazing speech and language therapists (SLTs) who participated in my consensus group on Tuesday afternoon. The group was hosted by the Dementia and Mental Health Clinical Excellence Network. I was lucky enough to have 36 extremely enthusiastic and interested SLTs who attended the session.

The meeting used Nominal Group Technique- a method of gaining consensus without undue influence from one particular person or a couple of people. This involves asking people to generate ideas to a question (in silence) and writing these down. Then going round robin style to share ideas, clarifying and discussing them briefly before individuals silently choose their top 8 ideas and write them on separate cards. Participants are then asked to rank the ideas individually. 8 being most important, 1 being least important (putting the cards away as they make decision), then 7& 2, 6 & 3, 5 & 4. These are then collected and collated for analysis. The ratings can be reviewed for further rating and ranking to refine the consensus process.

Prior to the meeting I had felt anxious that the SLT participants may find it boring and tedious and generally a methodological blah! But to my surprise I had really positive feedback. Not only did people highlight that being involved in research made them feel they were being heard but also that the process itself was clinically useful. People described feeling that they had really reflected on their practice and what the key components of the intervention are that they themselves deliver. They felt they refined their motivation and rationale for this activity. A number of people also reported enjoying the process of hearing others opinions and felt this was a great way of learning.

I hadn’t necessarily anticipated the clinical sharing and learning component of this exercise –  of sharing knowledge and developing skills. The committee of the CEN suggested they may even use this type of method again for workshop tasks! What a great experience. I am so grateful to have had this opportunity to integrate a real breadth of clinical expertise into my research project. Now to analyse the data! Argh!

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