Building a job/grant application

I have often found myself applying for jobs with an apology as my opening line. I seem to start by highlighting the areas where I am not sure if I really fit the criteria. Where I have the least experience. I assume they want to know how much of a burden I might be. By the time I have gotten around to the good stuff I have also emphasised that I would do my best and try really hard, even though I am not sure I have done half of this stuff before. Over the years I have realised that although this might be how I feel inside (the honest truth) this is not what an employer wishes to hear. I have been an employer and conducted interviews. When I think about those interviews I can recall the way my heart sank each time an individual started answering me in this way. I didn’t want to consider the time I would need to spend working on getting them up to speed- I wanted to hear that they could be an asset to the team.

Having said that I know I am not the only SLT who presents themselves in this way at interviews. I have been asked to look at job applications and practice interview questions with a few friends. Recently I was describing to one of these friends that perhaps she should consider the whole process a little differently- I asked her if she were to employ a builder who she would consider:

1) The builder who told her he wasn’t sure if he could build it,  might need to get some outside assistance but will try his best

OR

2) The builder who says it’ll be no problem and he’ll get it done

OR (beware)

3) The builder who knows best- who tells you your ideas are all wrong and he has a better idea.

My friend thought this was ever so useful. Consequently she sat down and completely re-wrote her covering letter. She stated that she had never really thought of it all this way- she hadn’t considered her employment as an investment. Yet although promoting oneself as the right fit for the job, with confidence, is valuable, it is also important to listen, take feedback and advice to ensure you can be the best fit.

I have been endeavouring to fit this analogy to my research self. And at the recent RCSLT Research Champions day I attended the grant funding workshop (as of course I do need to think about my future beyond my PhD now argh). At this workshop I found myself pleasantly surprised by the approach being described for grant writing, it really isn’t so different. It is called The 10 key sentences. The idea is that these sentences should start with an introduction that explains what the research will achieve, why it is important and how your going to do this in 10 sentences, without using references. Once this key paragraph is written you can then break it down and address each area in turn, with the relevant evidence. I interpreted this idea as demonstrating what your selling, why and how. By presenting the solution first, rather than the problem you are a little more like builder no. 2. You are demonstrating your value as an investment. By presenting the why (the problem) first, which is what I am tempted to do, your a little more like builder no. 1. But if you are too concrete and don’t accept help, advice and ideas your more like builder no. 3.

Having said all that I will need to apply this. Execution is the harder step. Especially with that voice inside your head telling you to tell the complete truth about your weaknesses not your strengths! Nevermind- I have a bit of time until I need to think about this toooooo seriously……………………………………………….