Blogging the evidence: Summarising my systematic review of functional communication interventions for PPA

I have just published my most recent article from my PhD thesis. So, I thought it best to write a brief blog- a taster if you like – providing an overview of the article itself. The article describes the work I did on a systematic review of functional communication interventions:

Volkmer, A., Spector, A., Meitanis, V., Warren, J. D., & Beeke, S. (2019). Effects of functional communication interventions for people with primary progressive aphasia and their caregivers: a systematic review. Aging & mental health, 1-13.

People with Primary Progressive Aphasia (a language led dementia) experience a variety of difficulties with language such as difficulties in understanding word meanings, difficulties thinking of words, difficulties finding the sounds to articulate the words and difficulties in understanding and using sentences. Yet there is relatively little research on management of these speech and language symptoms. Of the literature available, the majority focuses on impairment based approaches such as word relearning interventions. Yet speech and language therapists working in clinical settings across the UK report that they prioritise more functional communication interventions when working with people with PPA. Given this lack of focus on functional communication interventions in the research literature to date this study sought to answer the following questions:

  1. What are the current functional communication interventions for people with PPA and their caregivers?
  2. What is the effectiveness of these interventions?
  3. What are the key intervention components?

We conducted a systematic search of 8 databases, the grey literature and trials databases from 1998 to 2018 to identify all study designs containing empirical data on functional communication focused interventions for people with PPA and their caregivers. Data was then extracted using the ITAX adaptation (O’Rourke et al, 2018). The ITAX adaptation is based on an intervention taxonomy that allows for comparison of standard protocol items that should be reported in intervention trials.  This allowed for comparison of delivery characteristics such as mode, method of contact, materials, location, duration and scripting components. Study outcomes were also compared across the studies

We identified 19 studies, comprising 11 case studies, one case series, one pilot intervention trial, five intervention trials (no control) and one controlled intervention trial. This represents an increase in the number of functional communication interventions studies when compared to previous reviews.

Key findings from the review highlight that including communication partners in the intervention and focusing on skill building techniques – developing the person’s strengths, may be particularly useful methods of supporting maximal generalisation of anything learned in therapy. It is more difficulties to identify any additional conclusions as there was such variability in terms of components such as delivery location and dosage, and these may be much more dependent on the individual’s needs.

Across all 19 studies, 42 different outcome measures were used. Only two studies used the same measure, designed by the authors (the same authors of both studies). This meant that study outcomes were incomparable. Of these outcomes, 19 provided statistical data on significance – 17 of which demonstrated a significant improvement across 8 different studies. The key implication is the need for a set of core outcome measures, used across the research field to allow for cross-study comparison.

Conclusions:

Building on existing strategies and practising these with a communication partner have been identified as key components of functional communication focused interventions for people with PPA and their caregivers. We need more research, using more robust research methods and common outcome measures (such as those that focus on self-efficacy and quality of life) in order to fully understand the effectiveness of functional communication focused interventions.

 

To read the full article please go to: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13607863.2019.1617246

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.